Basal Cell Cancer

Basal Cell Cancer is the most common form of skin cancer and affects nearly one million Americans each year. A major factor that contributes to the development of basal cell cancer is sun exposure particularly on the face, ears, neck, scalp, shoulders, and back. Those who have fair skin, blond or red hair, and blue, green, or grey eyes are most at risk. In rare instances, tumors can also develop on unexposed area and may be a result of exposure to radiation, non-healing wounds, chronic inflammatory skin conditions, and complications of burns, scars, infections, vaccinations, or even tattoos. Although Basal cell cancer is most often seen in older people, the average age of onset for new patients has been decreasing.

When diagnosed early, basal cell cancer is easily treated. Although is does not metastasize to other parts of the skin or organs, larger tumors can grow and invade and destroy surrounding tissue leading to disfigurement.

Basal cell carcinoma can present in many different ways including non-healing sores or red patches, shiny bumps that may or may not have some pigment, pink indented growths with rolled borders and tiny blood vessels on the surface, or scar-like patches with poorly defined borders.